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Pre-Raphaelite works mentioned in the text, but not shown on those pages.

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The Girlhood of Mary Virgin

Dante Gabriel Rossetti; The Girlhood of Mary Virgin (1848) -- Rossetti's first major work, painted under Holman Hunt's tutelage, shows a good deal of Hunt's influence, as well as the artist's own problems with perspective. (All the figures are the same size, regardless of where they are in the picture, giving things a rather flat look.) Symbols abound: the lily, the dove, the lamp (purity), the trellis (the Holy Ghost), the palm fronds. Rossetti wrote a sonnet explaining all this, and incorporated it into the frame.
    Rossetti's younger sister Christina sat for the Virgin; the artist's mother, Frances Rossetti, for Saint Anne. The odd little embroidery table reappears in 
The Annunciation.

William Holman Hunt; The Eve of St. Agnes (1848) -- Hunt's first Pre-Raphaelite picture depicts the final scene from Keats's poem, when Porphyro and Madeline flee the castle, tiptoeing  over the drunken porter:

The chains lie silent on the footworn stones
The key turns, and the door upon its hinges groans
And they are gone; ay, ages long ago
These lovers fled away into the storm

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